10 Titles on Black Lives Matter

If you are curious about the Black Lives Matter movement in America try the 10 digital titles listed below.

Non-Fiction

fromblmtobl-195x300From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation by Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor
The eruption of mass protests in the wake of the police murders of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, and Eric Garner in New York City have challenged the impunity with which officers of the law carry out violence against black people and punctured the illusion of a post-racial America. The Black Lives Matter movement has awakened a new generation of activists. In this stirring and insightful analysis, activist and scholar Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and the persistence of structural inequality, such as mass incarceration and black unemployment. In this context, she argues that this new struggle against police violence holds the potential to reignite a broader push for black liberation.
7d07a29fe48e363384617fd370d1739b--black-quotes-nonfiction-booksSpecial Reports: Black Lives Matter by Sue Bradford Edwards
Black Lives Matter covers the shootings that touched off passionate protests, the work of activists to bring about a more just legal system, and the tensions in US society that these events have brought to light. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Essential Library is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.
MTUwMDYxLW5ldGx5ZGJvZzpPRE4wMDAzNDQ0NDI2So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo
Editor at Large of The Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the “N” word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don’t dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

 

9780062698544_p0_v4_s550x406_480x480How Not to Get Shot by D. L. Hughley
Hughley uses humor to draw attention to injustice, sardonically offering advice on a number of lessons, from “How to make cops feel more comfortable while they’re handcuffing you” and “The right way to wear a hoodie” to “How to make white food, like lobster rolls” and “Ten types of white people you meet in the suburbs.”
LogoI Can’t Breathe by Matt Taibbi
Matt Taibbi’s deeply reported retelling of these events liberates Eric Garner from the abstractions of newspaper accounts and lets us see the man in full—with all his flaws and contradictions intact. A husband and father with a complicated personal history, Garner was neither villain nor victim, but a fiercely proud individual determined to do the best he could for his family, bedeviled by bad luck, and ultimately subdued by forces beyond his control.
imagesBlack Lives Matter And Music by Fernando Orejuela
Music has always been integral to the Black Lives Matter movement in the United States, with songs such as Kendrick Lamar’s “Alright,” J. Cole’s “Be Free,” D’Angelo and the Vanguard’s “The Charade,” The Game’s “Don’t Shoot,” Janelle Monae’s “Hell You Talmbout,” Usher’s “Chains,” and many others serving as unofficial anthems and soundtracks for members and allies of the movement. In this collection of critical studies, contributors draw from ethnographic research and personal encounters to illustrate how scholarly research of, approaches to, and teaching about the role of music in the Black Lives Matter movement can contribute to public awareness of the social, economic, political, scientific, and other forms of injustices in our society.
268x0wHave Black Lives Ever Mattered? by Mumia Abu-Jamal
In December 1981, Mumia Abu-Jamal was shot and beaten into unconsciousness by Philadelphia police. He awoke to find himself shackled to a hospital bed, accused of killing a cop. He was convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that Amnesty International has denounced as failing to meet the minimum standards of judicial fairness. In Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?, Mumia gives voice to the many people of color who have fallen to police bullets or racist abuse, and offers the post-Ferguson generation advice on how to address police abuse in the United States.
68251Black Lives Matter by Raymond Sturgis
Each day that is blessed to us, some black man, woman or child has been killed or mistreated by police or by another black person. Black people in America should have always organized against injustices from police and other misguided blacks who are a threat to their survival. I cannot understand why, after hundreds of years and comprehensive progress in civil and human rights, black people’s lives are still not valued or respected. Black Lives Matter is a book that expounds on the realities and hardships of black people living in America. The clouds of hate and distrust must end so black people can avoid the senseless violence and disrespect they endure from other black people, police, and government. If BLACK LIVES TRULY MATTER, then swift justice must be enforced for those that violated the freedoms and peace of blacks trying to live in America.

Fiction

Logo (1)Light It Up by Kekla Magoon
Told in a series of vignettes from multiple viewpoints, Kekla Magoon’s Light It Up is a powerful, layered story about injustice and strength. A girl walks home from school. She’s tall for her age. She’s wearing her winter coat. Her headphones are in. She’s hurrying. She never makes it home. In the aftermath, while law enforcement tries to justify the response, one fact remains: a police officer has shot and killed an unarmed thirteen-year-old girl. The community is thrown into upheaval, leading to unrest, a growing movement to protest the senseless taking of black lives, and the arrival of white supremacist counter demonstrators.
Logo (2)The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed. Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.