Sci-Fi for Beginners

Here’s a list for readers who think they don’t like sci-fi.  These titles are a guaranteed entertaining introduction to Science Fiction.

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
An expert at simulated war games, Andrew “Ender” Wiggin believes that he is engaged in one more computer war game when, in truth, he is commanding the last Earth fleet against an alien race seeking Earth’s complete destruction.


The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
It’s an ordinary Thursday morning for Arthur Dent . . . until his house gets demolished. The Earth follows shortly after to make way for a new hyperspace express route, and Arthur’s best friend has just announced that he’s an alien. After that, things get much, much worse.

The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
No one would have believed in the last years of the nineteenth century that this world was being watched. Yet across the gulf of space, intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic regarded this earth with envious eyes. Then, late one night, in the middle of the English countryside, they landed.

A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller, Jr.
In a nightmarish ruined world slowly awakening to the light after sleeping in darkness, the infant rediscoveries of science are secretly nourished by cloistered monks dedicated to the study and preservation of the relics and writings of the blessed Saint Isaac Leibowitz.

Dune by Frank Herbert
Set on the desert planet Arrakis, Dune is the story of the boy Paul Atreides, heir to a noble family tasked with ruling an inhospitable world where the only thing of value is the “spice” melange, a drug capable of extending life and enhancing consciousness. Coveted across the known universe, melange is a prize worth killing for.

Foundation by Isaac Asimov
For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Sheldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future–to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years.

2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
On the moon, an enigma is uncovered. So great are the implications that, for the first time, men are sent deep into our solar system. But before they can reach their destination, things begin to go very wrong.



I, Robot by Isaac Asimov
Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-reading robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians and robots who secretly run the world–all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asimov’s trademark.

The Martian Chronicles by Ray Bradbury
The tranquility of Mars is disrupted by the earthmen who have come to conquer space, colonize the planet, and escape a doomed Earth. Earthmen conquer Mars and then are conquered by it, lulled by dangerous lies of comfort and familiarity, and enchanted by the lingering glamour of an ancient, mysterious native race

Contact by Carl Sagan
The future is here…in an adventure of cosmic dimension. In December 1999, a multinational team journeys out to the stars, to the most awesome encounter in human history. Who — or what — is out there? 


Neuromancer by William Gibson
Case was the sharpest data-thief in the matrix–until he crossed the wrong people and they crippled his nervous system, banishing him from cyberspace. Now a mysterious new employer has recruited him for a last-chance run at an unthinkably powerful artificial intelligence. 

Rendezvous with Rama by Arthur C. Clarke
An enormous cylindrical object has entered Earth’s solar system on a collision course with the sun. A team of astronauts are sent to explore the mysterious craft, which the denizens of the solar system name Rama. What they find is astonishing evidence of a civilization far more advanced than ours.